Ponder this:

Sunday, December 27, 2009

Revisiting childhood storytimes

When I was very little we had many many story books, from which my mother would read to us at bedtime, or whenever we could coerce her into it.  There are a few stories from those books that have remained in my memory.

One is the story of the talking lollipop.  Another is the story of the sad neglected evergreen tree.  I have eBayed my way into ownership of the book containing those two tales.  As I read the former, it seems to me that it could never be published now, since to those who would see filth and danger to children everywhere, it would smack of pedophilia. Imagine . . . in those days it was just an innocent story. I don't think I was harmed by it.

The third story, which I had hoped was in this book, but is not, is about white holly berries jumping onto the smooth holly leaves and sledding down snowy hills ("Wheeeeeeeeeee!") until the leaves were all bent and prickly and the berries turned red from the cold.
...and that's why holly looks the way it does.
I'm still on the hunt for that one.

I have found, too, a book of Japanese Fairy Tales, published in 1905, to replace the copy we had [that probably burned up in the fire my crazy aunt started]. The illustrations are what I most recalled about the book, and I have only the vaguest recollection of the stories themselves.
I should probably read them now that I once again have the book in my possession.
There are images of the cover and pages in this post at Future Momo Jewelry.

7 comments:

JOE TODD said...

My grandfather always told me a story about a troll that lived under a bridge. I've never seen it in a book He might have just made it up Oh Well

Friko said...

Just found you and I like what you say about yourself.

Stories are always good and need repeating to each new generation.

June said...

Oh, Joe, that's The Three Billy Goats Gruff! http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/type0122e.html

Hi Friko! Glad you came by and thanks for leaving a note!

Lord Wellbourne said...

Books were always like siblings in our house growing up. Both of my parents encouraged the appetite for books. My father introduced me to Alexandre Dumas from which I'm sure my love for history and swashbucklers derived. My mother was very clever--she would read to me almost every night until one evening she said she'd like to be read to as well. And I should write the story myself. And thus it began......

Barb said...

Books were my best friends when I was a child - too quiet and bookish for my own good. I still have many of them - I may actually bequeath them to my Grandchildren now that they're starting to read. If I can part with them...

GooseBreeder said...

Oh never part with your precious books, those childhood friends.Let the grandies have a special treat when they visit and look then.
My Christmas treat was the full set of Beatrix Potter..oh delight and wonder!And all for $22 and the further purchase of four books!

Autumn Mist said...

I still have many books from my childhood, Flambards, The Marlows and the Traitor, etc. I will have to do something with them eventually, but I'm not sure about the grandchildren, it might be better to put them on Amazon so I know someone will cherish them as much as I have. Difficult, isn't it?